图灵访谈之三十三:专访Peter Lubbers

Peter Lubbers(twitter:@peterlubbers),《HTML5程序设计》作者。他在洛杉矶创立了世界上第一个也是最大的HTML5小组,现今已有4500多名成员。同年,他开始涉足HTML5培训。他在Kaazing公司设计并筹办了相关的前沿课程。现在,Peter已加入Google Chrome开发团队,担任Chrome Developer Relations Program Manager。

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以下是Peter答图灵社区问的回答原文,感谢流星在线xcloudwintercn大胖2guachoosemeHalfqlpnzj提问。

iTuring: When you were in Oracle, you have written some very good books. Do you see any difference in writing technical articles and technical books? And do you think technical writing has some impacts on your career development? Will you write books in the future?

Writing a book is a lot of work, so having written many books at Oracle definitely helped. However, the big difference was that the books I wrote at Oracle were part of the product documentation and not sold in bookstores. Pro HTML5 Programming was really the first retail book. It was a great experience and I definitely think I will write more books in the future. I just joined Google and I'm starting on some big new projects, so I don't think I'll write another book this year.

iTuring: Your new job in Google is Developer Relations Program Manager, how do you like it? Do you have something interesting to share with us?

Yes, I love it. One project I am really excited about at the moment is called Google Developers Live. This is a new area where we live stream (and record for playback later) lots of exciting content—from "Office Hours" where anyone can ask questions to specific presentations about particular subjects. This medium allows us to reach and interface with a world-wide audience from our local studios--its awesome. You can check it out at https://developers.google.com/live/.

iTuring: In the process of HTML5’s evolution, we have seen a lot of fluctuating attitudes from different browsers. As a team member of Chrome, would you mind to share with us some of the latest news about standardization? In the future, is there any chance that there will be an end to these splits? And what can we do to contribute to that?

At Google we are working very hard to move the web ahead and you can see that in lots of new standards that we are working on in the open with other browser vendors. Web Intents and WebRTC are just some of those that we are excited about.

iTuring: The two organizations--WHATWG and W3C--who are responsible for the development of HTML have decided on a degree of separation, meaning that there will be two versions of HTML5. In your opinion, how this might influence HTML5’s development?

There is a good article on it from Michael Smith (W3C). If you have followed it closely, it is not as dramatic as some people make it out to be. Improving the standard will require lots of help and that is what we should focus on. In the words of that same article: [it's] "your choice: Spend time helping or or waste time trolling."

iTuring: HTML5 is still far from its final standardization, and HTML5 received varied supports from different browsers, practically speaking, where can HTML5 be best applied at this moment? And where it might be in the future?

Many areas are finalized or in near-final state. On top of that, there are many polyfills that can be used to make the proposed features work in older browsers, so I think that HTML5 features can definitely be used today. I suggest caniuse.com and mobilehtml5.org as resources for checking browser support--these sites will give you a good idea of the current browser support for any given feature.

iTuring: Speaking from a broad sense, HTML5 is a set of standards with pretty rich content, a small part of it has been proved to be sufficient for many people to make their business work. In your opinion, if there is a set of inevitable knowledge of HTML5 that most developers should know, what may it include?

Depending on your use case, all of the different feature areas in HTML5 are equally important. Some of the key areas that stand out in my mind are the Canvas (graphics), offline and local storage (for offline apps), and WebSocket for bidirectional data transfer. Combine those areas and you can create powerful web apps that will rival the functionality of desktop apps.

Another thing developers should learn about are the developer tools--the built-in browser ones as well as the frameworks that can make development easier. Watch for a new one that some of my team members (Paul Irish (who wrote the foreword of the Pro HTML5 Programming) and Addy Osmani) are contributing to called Yeoman (http://yeoman.io). Finally, I highly recommend developers look at the great content on www.html5rocks.com.

iTuring: As Canvas and WebGL have gain supports from many browsers, what do you think the future of 2D and 3D apps in browsers? Comparing to desktop development environment, what do you think browser development environment? Where does its pros and cons lie?

I think the new, rich graphics support in the form of 2D canvas and WebGL is very exciting. These features are an important building block for building cutting-edge, fully immersive experiences. Couple them with live data, offline capabilities and you have a web app that can be as good (or better!) as a native application.

iTuring: Along with HTML5’s fast development, a lot of communities about HTML5 have arisen. How do you manage to balance between charged training and free promotion events, do you have any suggestions for China’s HTML5 community?

Recently, the San Francisco HTML5 User Group that I started 2.5 years ago became the largest Internet and Tech meetup in the world with over 5,000 members: http://technology.meetup.com/ All of our monthly meetup events are free and we love doing this for the community. Of course I am very lucky to be able to also do this full-time now at Google and with efforts like Google Developers Live we give away lots of great training and advice completely free!

The community meetup events provide great networking opportunities. Many people learn new stuff that they demonstrate in lightning talks after our main events. I strongly suggest teaming up with other enthusiasts to start meetups in China if you have not done so yet. Have a regular meeting and invite speakers to share their knowledge. If possible, record the shows and post them online. After a while you might get some sponsorship so you can provide some food and drinks and it will grow quickly I am sure.

iTuring: HTML5 is also a popular notion here in China, we have developers'get-together event, in which the number of attendees exceeds a thousand people. Would this level of popularity surprise you? In your opinion, what are the causes for that?

That is amazing! I am surprised indeed, but also very pleased to hear that. How often do you have them and what sort of venue do you host them in? I would love to come to one of your events one day.

iTuring: Would you please tell us more about HTML5’s commercial application or successful samples which you appreciate most?

The recent launch of the Tate Gallery project (partnered with Chrome): and the Cirque du Soleil ["Movi.Kanti.Revo"][19] preview at Google I/O: are some of my current favorites. I also love what the Financial Times have done with their mobile web application--that was great.

[19]: https://plus.google.com/102860501900098846931/posts/KFVVfcjW3aFget-together event, in which the number of attendees exceeds a thousand people. Would this level of popularity surprise you? In your opinion, what are the causes for that?**

That is amazing! I am surprised indeed, but also very pleased to hear that. How often do you have them and what sort of venue do you host them in? I would love to come to one of your events one day.

iTuring: Would you please tell us more about HTML5’s commercial application or successful samples which you appreciate most?

The recent launch of the Tate Gallery project (partnered with Chrome): and the Cirque du Soleil [


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